@nytimes
The New York Times
8 days ago
"It is demoralizing to welcome people aboard flights who look right through us with no response. Smiling, and saying little things like 'please' and 'thank you' always helps to boost our spirits," writes Kristie Koerbel, a veteran flight attendant.
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Replies

@acidburn1509
Acidburn1509
8 days ago
@nytimes What about..can you help me join the mile high club?
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@aurelius3395
Joseph Marku
8 days ago
@nytimes Really? I've received some semi-reptilian stares from some FAs before.
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@fergyrg
Randy Ferguson
8 days ago
@nytimes Same as how you can’t even apologize for taking off late or not tacking off at all. Or offering water when we have been sitting on the ground for 2 hrs and you all disappear…works both ways hon 😉
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@p3dft419
peter wong
8 days ago
@nytimes Nothing personal. Some humans were brought up by wolves, didn’t go to school, always played around in the dirt, and weren’t taught how to be courteous.
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@Don7312
Don73
8 days ago
@nytimes well, pls do understand that some people still $hit their pants before and during a flight, so the focus is on their butt cheeks and not face cheeks.
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@soapy37
pat mccrary
8 days ago
@nytimes Yeah, as a long time service industry employee, treating us as real people goes a long way. Certainly, its a two way street; a little empathy on our part can sometimes defuse a combustible situation. IMHO, everyone should " serve" in some capacity at some point
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@0wpRX0U0TGLKWYM
sige/Naga
7 days ago
@nytimes ❤️
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@liloo999
LilooTheTimeTraveler
7 days ago
@nytimes To siempre los saludo ❤️
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@daleleeack
@daleleeack🐕🌊🐦🌳🧶
5 days ago
@nytimes Great flying insights from #KristieKoerbel Thanks!
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